replay to each comment with a short paragraph. Original question. Dyna tells Ed that she will pay him $1,000 to set fire to her store so that she can collect under a fire insurance policy. Ed sets fire to the store, but Dyna refuses to pay. Can Ed recover? Why or why not?

replay to each comment with a short paragraph.
Original question. Dyna tells Ed that she will pay him $1,000 to set fire to her store so that she can collect under a fire insurance policy. Ed sets fire to the store, but Dyna refuses to pay. Can Ed recover? Why or why not?

1. The issue here is that Ed is trying to collect money for a contract that was for illegal services. A contract by definition is a set of promises constituting an agreement between parties giving each a legal duty to the other and the right to seek a remedy for the breach of the promises or the duties. There are four requirements for a valid contract. The four requirements are agreement, consideration, contractual compacity, and legality. The last of which is prominent in Dyna and Ed’s case. The legality requirement says that the contract’s purpose must be to accomplish some good that is legal and not against public policy. The contract that Dyna and Ed had together would be defined as a void contract. A void contract is a contract having no legally binding effect. Because the purpose of the contract was to burn down a building which is illegal, Ed cannot recover from Dyna. Business Law Today (standard edition)

2.Dyna would be the offeror of this contract, which means she is the person making an offer to Ed. Ed would be considered the offeree, or the person that was being offered the contract. The fact that this type of contract would be considered illegal, Ed would not be able to collect from Dyna. By committing arson, which is against the law, Ed is no longer able to collect on the verbal agreement made with Dyna. Any contract made to do something or sell something illegal is a void contract.
This type of contract would be considered a void contract, because of the nature of the act.
The courts will not help someone collect an illegal gambling debt, or payment for illegal drugs
or prostitution. The law treats these contracts as if they never existed – they are unenforceable or
void. This is the contract defense of illegality. (American Bar)